We’ve had a great time telling fly-fishing stories and sharing our knowledge of the pursuit of warmwater species for many years. But our time to work less and fish more has arrived. We will remove our website at the end of February and continue to sell our books and flies at fly-fishing shows in the future. Breambugs.com will offer our patterns and books on their website.

GREAT NEWS! IT’S FIXED!!!

If you had difficulties getting our website to accept your payment for your orders, we are very happy to announce that the experts fixed it. PLACE YOUR SPRING ORDER NOW. The fish are eagerly waiting for our flies!

Marabou On the Drop

Marabou On the Drop

Clear, wadable water enticed me to a long river pool with several deadfalls that I expected to harbor bass. I was wrong. The submerged branches were full of crappies that had migrated upstream from the reservoir that the stream feeds. Mini Minnies in white/silver counted to a depth of 3 feet before imparting short, slow strips brought aggressive strikes. If the vertical drop was intercepted before reaching 3 feet the fish tended to be a bit small, but when the fly was able to fall just a few counts deeper the crappies were in the 10- to 12-inch range. I released them all but I lost count about an hour before my last cast. Just lovin’ spring!

The Vertical Drop Wins Again

The Vertical Drop Wins Again

Lots of rain and roller-coaster temperatures left the water in my “go-to” pond high and discolored, but the 87-degree afternoon lured me out with my fly rod. Casts to deep wood structure were ignored despite numerous fly changes. Finally, I theorized that the darkened water protected the fish’s eyes from the intense sunlight and that the warmest water would be in the shallows. I tied on a chartreuse Bully’s Bluegill Spider that would be most easily visible and cat parallel to the shoreline. The fly was repeatedly hit on the verticle drop. Thirty bluegills, most over 8 inches, made deep bends in my 3-weight before I released them. It’s been a tough spring, but fishing is still the best part of it.

Lovin’ a Spring Pool

Lovin’ a Spring Pool

A break in the weather sent me to a spring’s entrance to a well-structured pool. The river was higher than normal by a few inches leaving the area wadable while creating large, slow eddies both above and below the spring’s flow. Deadfall branches border the upper eddy and bowling ball-sized rocks are scattered through the lower one. Full-sinking line that sinks at 3 i.p.s. carried a size-10 gray-over-silver zonker with a double mono weed guard to the deepest tree branches. The second cast brought a strike that was missed. The next slow retrieve produced the hookup of fat green sunfish. Several others came to hand before a 10-inch largemouth was brought to the net. A move to the downstream eddy changed the game as three rock bass preceded a tug of war with a feisty 12-inch smallmouth that sent me ashore with a big smile.