Not Bluegill or Bass

Not Bluegill or Bass

Beautiful Day! Warm weather caused smallies and rock bass out of the spring branch and into the river. Grandson Eddie and I fished for his first trout. Having fun with my youngest grandkid.

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Fishing Spring-fed Creeks

Fishing Spring-fed Creeks

Two sub-freezing nights prompted rock bass and smallmouth bass to migrate from their 36-degree stream into a spring branch with 54-degree water. Warmer water increased their metabolisms to the point they were actively feeding. Mini-Minnies and Ozark Woolly Buggers brought Continue reading

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Great Day!

Great Day!

Beautiful weather for fishing today. 59-degree air temp but 43-degree water. Caught green sunfish and longear like this one located among deadfall branches and rockpiles. They took size-10 white/silver Mini Minnies at a depth of 3 feet. Warmth caused them Continue reading

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When Temperatures Drop

When Temperatures Drop

Two frosty nights have dropped river water temperatures into the upper forties. Only 4 pale-colored bluegills were caught on our last trip. We suspect they were stream residents who are assuming their winter colors and feeding habits.  For success Continue reading

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Where Did They Go?

Where Did They Go?

In late autumn/early winter fish can’t rely on insects to satisfy their hunger. Their primary target becomes minnows and other little fish,  so Mini Minnie is our “go to” fly.  It has supple marabou for action, contrasting red Continue reading

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Smallmouths On the Move

Stream smallmouths are vagabonds in spring and fall. Stay on the move to find them, even targeting isolated structure in areas that are otherwise devoid of holding areas.  These features may hold several fish that are resting before moving.

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Consider This!

Reddington’s Butterstick series of rods offers the classic bamboo rod-action at 1/10th the price.  Matched with Rio’s Trout LT DT and a spare spool with their Sub-Surface Midge Tip to sink at 1.5 to 2 inches per second is Continue reading

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